Thursday, December 14, 2017


Water well dedication and school supplies 

What a glorious day this has been. We are all praising God for his goodness and faithfulness. All praises and glory are to him who is above all else.

The day started early as we loaded the car with our school supplies we purchased yesterday and headed out to Nakivale Refugee Settlement and the Emmaus Global Outreach Primary school. When we arrived we unloaded a car load of much needed supplies for the teachers and students. I wish you could have seen the teachers faces as we unloaded boxes of textbooks, readers, Bibles, world maps for each classroom, a case of chalk and paint and sealer for the woodwork. 

These teachers are very dedicated to the students and the school. Many months they are not receiving their full salary of $100.00. Add to that they have very limited resources to teach from. Their classrooms consist of a dim room, as there are only a couple of windows (no glass), dirt floors, chipped plaster walls with a painted blackboard on one wall. The students sit in rows on short wooden benches, 6 to 10 students per bench.

A student representative from each class gave thanks to all of you who have given to make this project possible. I was able to visit each class to take a few photos and video. It is interesting to see them in class as they have no textbooks or writing implement; pens, pencils, paper, or notebooks. The teachers asked questions and the students answer. It is all done by memory. At least the teachers will have access to a textbook for each subject. One of the biggest hits was a large dictionary, the school has never had a dictionary before. All the subjects are taught in English, which will be good for the students down the line but think about trying to do all your school work from memory and in a language that is not your native language. These children are amazing.

There was a number of students missing today as this is the day for their sector to receive the U.N food distribution. Which means they have to walk a couple miles to the distribution area for their sector than carry the food back to their homes. These are very heavy loads and it takes most of the day to complete the task.

We were just finishing up with the school supplies when the three member team from Living Water International, Uganda arrived at the school. They came with a team to teach the people who will be using the well how to operate it and maintain it. They also did a health class that was very interesting and they had a pastor to give glory to God. Pastor Lewi also thanked God and all the sponsors who have given to this project. You just cannot imagine what a blessing it is for these people to have access to a near by clean water supply. When the speeches and teaching ended everyone walk down to the well.

The Living Water team reactivated the pump and the first water was pumped. It was a very exciting time for the people. There was a crowd of maybe 500 people who were there to witness the first of the water to come from the well. The Living Water personnel gave more instructions on caring for the well pump and for securing it with a fence to keep animals away. The people elected a team of representatives that would oversee the well was maintained and secured. An added expense item will be a watchman that will live near the well. 

After the details were worked out with the oversight committee the people started to bring there jerrycans to fill with water. Again there was a lot of ceremony that took place with prayers of thanksgiving and singing of hymns. The gratitude shown by the people was nearly overwhelmingly. This clean water this close to their homes with greatly impact their daily lives in such a positive way. Getting clean water in the past could be an all day affair as they had to walk a couple miles to wait in a very long queue and then haul the jerrycans full of water back to their homes. The alternative was to get the dirty water from the lake, which was much quicker and often could be deadly as it is ridden with disease and parasites.

This project is far from being completed. This is the first phase and we are thanking God for the provision of this water. But we need to continue the project in order to get the water up the hill to the school and clinic. That will require a solar pump, piping and a water storage tower. Please continue to pray for this project and consider what your part may be in helping to bring this project to completion.


I have given information on how you can help below, but you can also further designate your gift to specifically helping the water project. On your check or in the comments for Palpal or Egiving, write in Send It Ahead Project - Water. That way your funds will go totally in support of the the water project.

Remember that you cannot take it with you, but you can “SEND IT AHEAD”.


If you can help we have a way for you to donate to these children’s needs. Go to www.watchtherefore.tv click on the donate button at the top of the page and please make sure you designate your tax deductible donation to the “Send It Ahead” program. While you’re at the web site please click on the Send It Ahead button at the top of the page to look for more updates and photos from the school.

Monday, December 11, 2017

Food

Food

One thing I love about East Africa is the food. It is simple and heavy in starches but I enjoy it. I do not enjoy it as much as my good friend Pastor Lewi though. I have seen some big eaters over the years and many of those were within my own family. Our clan could put away some groceries. How our poor mother kept up with a husband and 5 voracious eaters I will never know, but I digress. When Pastor Lewi orders a meal it is enough to feed the troops and I believe he could eat that size meal three times in a day. Now before you think my good friend is a glutton, I want to set the record straight. I said I thought he could eat three of those meals per day, not that he does.  Yes, when we are here on a visit for a week he eats quite well, but when he are not here food is much less available. And even when we are here we normally only eat two meals per day. We usually have a decent breakfast at the hotel and then a late lunch or supper, depending on when we return. But when the Pastor lights into a half of a fried chicken to is a sight to behold. When has finished there is nothing left on the plate except for a few pieces of the larger bones. He man does love to eat chicken.

I actually eat a lot of fish when I am here. That is the one thing I’ve found that will be fairly consistent from place to place. Normally they will have a minimum of two fish selections on the menu; one will be a fish fillet which will be served with rice, chips (French fries) or both. The other will be a whole fish fried up and looking at you on the plate. It is very good but some people have problem with their food looking back at them. 

Other menu options are pork, beef and goat. I had beef for dinner today and it was tasty. It was chunks of boiled beef, the Lord only knows from what cut it came from, here beef is beef, you may get some tender pieces and you may get shoe leather. Today mine was not bad, a little chewy but at least I could cut the large chunks into smaller bite size pieces.

Last night I tried the pork chops. Now I have to believe it really was pork and it was definitely chopped, I believe probably with a machete. What ever sauce or marinade they used was very salty and then they must have put it on the fire and then went out for lunch themselves. Let’s just say I will not be recommending the pork chops.

Our driver had the goat stew today over matoke, a cooked green banana that is mashed. I do not mind it in limited quantities. He had options, other than the matoke, of potato, rice, chips or lugali (posho). 

There are many restaurants around here but they all have very similar menus. Some will have pasta dishes or Indian, but most are the normal East African dishes.

A couple times a week I’ll have a chapati for lunch. A chapati is a flat bread fried in a shallow pan of very hot oil. Some places will fry them with less oil than others but they are pretty greasy no matter where you get them. There is a small shop on the way to Nakivale that we stop at almost every day to buy chapati. As I said I only eat one a couple times while I’m here but I always buy a few everyday to give out to the cow and goat boys we pass on the Nakivale Settlement. Maama Ssonko is the name of the shop, did not misspell it that is how it is written on the shop. Maama Ssonko is a heavy set lady who sits on the ground and takes the money for the chapati. She sits because she is missing one leg. She is a very friendly person who loves to joke around with Pastor Lewi. She has a crew of three or four helpers around that are all busy either pulling the dough into just the right size balls, or rolling out the dough to the exact thickness, which is very thin. Then placing the thin sheets of dough into the pan of hot oil. The technical part comes now with the person who knows when to raise the edge of the dough up enough to let air get in between dough and hot fat. That makes the chapati puff up and the thin dough becomes a thick fried bread, then he knows when to turn them over and the correct doneness. And he does all this with a long stick like you would roast a marshmallow with. Anyway, Maama Ssonko does a very large business, people are stopping all day long and come from miles away for her chapati. They go through 75 kilos a day of chapati dough. Oh, when I said shop you may have the wrong impression. There is a shop of kind it is about a 10 x 10 building, mostly filled with young kids and babies. The cooking operation takes place in front on a dirt floor, under a tin lean-to, the under side of the tin is so thick with black smoke that am sure you could scrape it off. It is one of the days highlights to stop and listen to banter between Lewi and the crew.

While we are on the subject of food and I am in Uganda to try and help about 600 orphans, I, as part of the team at Poured Out For The Nations, am looking for so help. We would like to feed these children a morning meal. That meal would consist of a cup of sorghum porridge. That doesn’t sound like much of a meat to most of us, but when you’re used to having nothing that cup of porridge can make a huge difference in the way you face the day. I do not have exact figures as yet but the best I can tell right now is that we could feed those 600 children for about $70 per week. Now there would be some other start up costs, buying 600 plastic cups and a very large cooking pot to cook the porridge in. Even if my figures are off by some margin, I still am pretty sure that $100 a week would be the top of the margin of error.

That is where you can be an vital part of this ministry. These children need your help in getting them a morning meal that they desperately need. The Bible tells us not to store up treasures houses here on earth. I know right now there are some of you that need to open your store houses and give to God’s work to these children in Uganda. Will you help the Lord to bless these children with a cup of porridge?

Remember that you cannot take it with you, but you can “SEND IT AHEAD”.



If you can help we have a way for you to donate to these children’s needs. Go to www.watchtherefore.tv click on the donate button at the top of the page and please make sure you designate your tax deductible donation to the “Send It Ahead” program. You can further designate your funds by adding; Water, Teachers, or Food. While you’re at the web site please click on the Send It Ahead button at the top of the page to look for more updates and photos from the school.

Sunday, December 10, 2017

The Jesus Film


Jesus Film

Today marked the fourth full showing of the Jesus Film in its several different formats. I say full because our very first attempt did not go well. I knew there would be challenges showing the film in areas with no electricity. It took some searching but I was able to come up with a combination of mini battery operated projector and a back up battery pack, external speaker and enough cords and plugs to start my own electronics shop. I tested it out before I left home and thought I had the bugs worked out of it. But TIA (you’ll have to look back in previous posts to see definition of TIA).

The battery in the projector even with the battery pack would not power the unit long enough to watch a whole film. I was glad the first showing was to the children. We explained that this was the preview of what they would see tomorrow. The two next showings we hooked the projector up to a car battery through a  transformer. That seemed to work very well. We were able to show the children’s film and the women’s film with no problems.

The children’s film I have is only in English. For the children at the Emmaus Global Outreach school that is not so much of an issue because they are taught English, plus this is a good practice tool for they English lessons. But in the church we were in today the children did not speak much English so we are showing the regular Jesus Film in Kinyarwanda. And the women’s Film we showed in Swahili. I do wish the children’s film was in Kinyarwanda, that is their native language and it is what is spoken in the homes and around the village. So I believe they would get more out of it if it was in their native language.

When we showed the children’s film at the Emmaus Global Outreach primary school there were appropriately 300 children in attendance. That has been our largest crowd, and I think it may have been to large. The people in the back had a hard time seeing and hearing. For the women’s Film there were about 75 in attendance. I know there were a few, maybe a dozen of the children that raised hands to make a decision to follow Christ after the film. 

Today we had a mixed group of about 200 people but with more children than adults. So we started showing the children’s film in English. This was when we learned the children did not know English so we switched to the regular Jesus Film in Kinyarwanda. And again we had about 75 ladies for the women’s Film which we showed in Swahili.

An invitation was given but with speaking a different language I simply referred anyone wanting more information about being saved by faith in Christ to see one of their own pastors.

Water update. We need to build a fence around the well. We contacted a fencing contractor that works on the Settlement for a bid on the job. Our need is for a fairly small enclosure about 15m x 45m. We were amazed by the extremely high price for such a small job. It was way out of our price range. These contractors are used to doing business with large NGO’s that do not have the budget constraints that we have. We will now put up a block wall that we can do with local labor with a much smaller price tag. But it will still cost money that we do not have at this time.

That is where you can be an vital part of this ministry. These children need your help in getting them the water they desperately need and a fence is part of that need. The Bible tells us not to store up treasures houses here on earth. I know right now there are some of you that need to open your store houses and give to God’s work to these children in Uganda.

Remember that you cannot take it with you, but you can “SEND IT AHEAD”.



If you can help we have a way for you to donate to these children’s needs. Go to www.watchtherefore.tv click on the donate button at the top of the page and please make sure you designate your tax deductible donation to the “Send It Ahead” program. You can further designate your funds by adding; Water, Teachers, or Food. While you’re at the web site please click on the Send It Ahead button at the top of the page to look for more updates and photos from the school.

Friday, December 8, 2017

Roads and traffic


I am beginning to feel like Goldilocks as I will be changing to yet another hotel tomorrow. The first one was too expensive and poor WiFi. The second has good WiFi and is cheaper but poor restaurant area and you have to go out into the hallway to turn on the switch for the hot water heater when you take a shower. Time will tell about the truth of it, but we visited the new hotel, the Acacia Hotel, for lunch today and the restaurant was indoors and the food was good. The rooms and bathrooms are nicer and the WiFi seemed adequate. Plus it has the advantage of being closer to Nakivale so will cut some off the driving time.

The thing that really made up my mind to see another hotel was that the road to this hotel goes through the only golf course in town. And on days that they have high government officials playing or have a tournament they simply close the road off to all traffic. This makes it significantly more difficult to leave the hotel, trying to find alternate routes of travel. Almost all of the side roads, anything off the main roads through Mbarra, are very poor. They have been neglected for many many years. At one time most had been paved but the asphalt has been chipped away from the edges making a one lane road of pot holes. And the edges have been eroded by rain and traffic over the past decades.

The traffic in and around Mbarra is extremely congested, not as bad as Kampala but very bad. Drivers have no respect for lane markings or even divided highways. If there is a traffic jam going in one direction then people will cross over and drive into on coming traffic in opposite lane. You add to that mess about 10 motorbike taxis for every car and they are flying around in every direction like a swam of bees. And of course you have the larger taxis, about the size of an old VW bus, that carry about 18 to 20 people with all their worldly possessions tied onto the top and you have a pretty good picture of the traffic.

Once we get out of the city area we have approximately 34 miles to travel from Mbarra to the school on the Nakivale Settlement. The main road is 21 miles of really nice asphalt highway, the only real challenge is the extreme speed bumps they use in every little community that you pass trough. And of course you have the herds of cattle and goats that are free grazing along the way and may at anytime cross from one side or the road to the other.

At the end of that 21 miles of good highway you enter the Nakivale Settlement road system. There are probably hundreds of dirt road miles that crisscross the 75 square miles of the Settlement. We have to travel on about 13 of those miles. These roads are ether very dusty when dry or very slick when wet. And wet or dry they are terribly rough with pot holes, washboards and washout areas from heavy rains. 

To give you an idea of what those roads are like, it takes us one and a half hours to travel the 34 miles. A half hour of that is on the 21 miles of pavement, the other hour is to travel the remaining 13 miles. I’ll leave you to do the math from here. Let me just say that it is a long tiring trip twice a day, and it gets to be simply bone jarring.

I do need to make it clear that even though there are a number of challenges we face here and the driving and traffic being just a part of that, the end result of being able to help these precious children is more than worth it. I tell you about the challenges not to make it sound difficult or that we are not happy doing this work. It is because the way of life here is so very different than most people will every encounter. We truly love the people here, they are the most friendly and welcoming that you will ever meet anywhere. We are truly humbled daily by their generosity and love for us. 

Poured Out For The Nations is a very small organization. We are not like the huge NGO’s like World Vision, USAID, Compassion, or any number of others. We do not have lots of money to throw at huge programs. We are trying to help 600 orphans live a healthier life, get an education and maybe have a few of them get to a place where they can get out of the poverty they are now in and go on to help others. These children are receiving a Bible based education from a cadre of dedicated teachers that is teaching them that to love others is more important than loving ones self. That God loves every one of them and that one day it may be one of them that will make a difference in someone else’s life.

That is where you can be an vital part of this ministry. These children need your help. The Bible tells us not to store up treasures houses here on earth. I know right now there are some of you that need to open your store houses and give to God’s work for these children in Uganda.

Remember that you cannot take it with you, but you can “SEND IT AHEAD”.



If you can help we have a way for you to donate to these children’s needs. Go to www.watchtherefore.tv click on the donate button at the top of the page and please make sure you designate your tax deductible donation to the “Send It Ahead” program. You can further designate your funds by adding; Water, Teachers, or Food. While you’re at the web site please click on the Send It Ahead button at the top of the page to look for more updates and photos from the school.

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Water well update


Water well update

This is the reason I am here on this trip. I thought the pumping and testing of the water well was taking place while I was flying here, which would have been Thursday and Friday November 30th and December 1st. But when I arrived Pastor Lewi said they were not there but would start the first of next week, Monday the 4th of December. On Monday we found out the Living Water pumping crew would start on Tuesday. 

The crew did actually arrive on Monday evening and set tents to stay in near the well site. When we arrived at the well site on Tuesday morning the crew were all set up and had started the pumping process. I was actually able to have drink of water coming from the well. Maybe not my smartest move since no testing of the water had been completed but God has had this project from the beginning and I cannot believe He was going to kill me now for taking a first drink. We were able to take a short video of me taking the drink and I hope to be able to upload it to this blog on my return to the US.

Once the pumping test was complete and samples had been taken to for the lab to test, the work began on installing the pump. This was quite a job since a cement basin and run-off trough had to be constructed. When the basin and trough had been completed we took another short video of using the hand pump for the first time. It was wonderful to see water coming from that pump after all the prayers and sacrifice people around the country and the world have been involved in.

So the Living Water crew packed up and left on December 6th after making sure everything was in working order. They disabled the pump so that it could not be operated until after the dedication next week. Included in the dedication will be a time of prayer and praise for God’s provision as well as instruction in hygiene and well pump maintenance. This complete package is the reason we chose to have Living Water International as the drill team for this project. The good relationship we have had with the Ugandan team as well as the home office in Houston, Texas has been exceptional. 

We are all here at the Emmaus Global Outreach primary school in the Nakivale settlement, Uganda are praising God for his goodness and faithfulness even though we had fears and doubts. 

We continue to ask for your prayers as this project is far from finished. Thank the Lord we have water, but right now it is 274 meters uphill to where it really needs to be. If you want to look us up on Google Earth the well coordinates are: 
S 00’46”23.3
E 39’56”39.8

What we are calling phase 2 may in actuality have to be completed in several steps.  First we have install a security fence around the well site, in order to keep out animals and vandals. Which we have absolutely no funding for.

Then we will have to buy pipe and dig a ditch for the pipe from the well site up to the school. At the school there will have be a water tower and tank installed. In order to get the water from the well to the storage tank will require a solar pump. We cannot even buy a pump or even get an estimated cost until we get the pumping report back.

The next part of the water project will be piping the water from the storage tank to the individual areas where it is needed; school, kitchen, clinic, etc. 

And the final step will be the installation of drip irrigation for the ability to raise a food supply on a year round basis.

Someone may ask what is the total cost in order to complete this entire project. I cannot answer that. At this time there are simply to many variables. But if there is someone out there that feels God to telling them to fund this project in its entirety, I can only assure you that we will be extremely diligent in reporting and accountability of every dollar or shilling spent.

Thank you all for your continued prayers and financial support.

Remember that you cannot take it with you, but you can “SEND IT AHEAD”.



If you can help we have a way for you to donate to these children’s needs. Go to www.watchtherefore.tv click on the donate button at the top of the page and please make sure you designate your tax deductible donation to the “Send It Ahead” program. You can further designate your funds by adding; Water, Teachers, or Food. While you’re at the web site please click on the Send It Ahead button at the top of the page to look for more updates and photos from the school.

Teachers and Nurses


The teachers at the Emmaus Global Outreach primary school at Nakivale Uganda are some of the most dedicated young people you will find anywhere. In addition to the 10 teachers there are also two nurses on the school staff. All of them work many, many hours per week for a salary of $100 per month. Think about that for a moment and let it sink in. How long would $100 last us over a months time? Most of us will spend more than that on our morning coffee or any number of other unnecessary items over a months time. 

Ok, now how many would continue in a job that could only pay you one-half of the salary you were promised? Which is exactly what these individuals are doing. Am I trying to lay a guilt trip on you? To be honest, yes. I would like to see a number of teachers adopt these teachers. And also nurses to adopt the nurses. I am not just speaking about their salaries, although that is a true need. I would like to see a connection, a relationship between these teachers and you and your classroom. Pray, pray, pray for these teachers and nurses. I wish each of you could come here to see the conditions they have to work in. Dirt floor classrooms, no teaching materials, if they have chalk it is a blessing.

Most, if not all of them have Facebook, email, and cell phones. Now, someone is asking why do they have cell phones if they are that poor. Because cell phones are relatively cheap in Africa and there are no landlines in the Bush, but cell towers are all over. And they do not have monthly cell phone plans like most of us do. They have to buy “air time” and they are very frugal with using them. They only have to pay for out going calls, so they will “flash” each other. Make a call but hang up before the person answers. No one is charged but they know who has called them. Also they use WhatsApp and you can communicate all over the world for little or no cost.

Are there ten teachers out there who would pray about supporting a teacher for $100 per month? And a couple of nurses who would do the same. Are there 20 teachers who would give $50 a month. We would of course like to see a commitment of giving so that these teachers and nurses could feel secure that there pay would be there every month. But that is not to say we would not be overjoyed with your onetime gifts, anything you can do will drastically help to improve not only these teachers welfare but also the 586 students they teach. Just think of those class sizes.

I am not a computer genus, if fact I have trouble turning the thing on. Writing this blog is a big stretch for me. But I would like to add photos of the teachers at some point. Maybe I can figure out how to do that when I return to the states. I think it would be very helpful to you if you could see their faces and classrooms. I can make a google photos share album of the teachers and if you are serious about praying and/or supporting them I will add you to the share. You would have to contact me with your email address.

I have given information on how you can help below, but you can also further designate your gift to specifically helping teachers. On your check or in the comments for Palpal or Egiving, write in Send It Ahead Project - teachers. That way your funds will go totally in support of the teachers salaries. For nurses you would use the same format.

Remember that you cannot take it with you, but you can “SEND IT AHEAD”.


If you can help we have a way for you to donate to these children’s needs. Go to www.watchtherefore.tv click on the donate button at the top of the page and please make sure you designate your tax deductible donation to the “Send It Ahead” program. While you’re at the web site please click on the Send It Ahead button at the top of the page to look for more updates and photos from the school.

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

The work continues

I have been in Uganda for a few days now and thank the Lord that I had minimal effects from the jet lag. I have been going to sleep earlier than normal and waking up earlier also. But that gives me plenty of time to read my daily devotions and pray before breakfast.

Time has a different concept for the people in Africa. No one seems to be in a hurry, the saying here is “Americans have watches, Africans have time.” That is until they get in a vehicle then, Katie bar the door, because the demolition derby has begun. It would be rather interesting or even funny if it is not you that is riding in the middle of it. 

As example our driver is handicapped I believe from Polio, so he has little or no use of his legs. In the US there are devices installed in vehicles so that it can be operated with hands only. This vehicle is not so equipped. Desire, that is our drivers name, has to use his right hand to grab his pants leg in order to lift his leg up and move his foot from throttle to brake and back again. This tends to add significant seconds to action time. But on the upside it keeps me praying.

I have changed hotels after four days. The first one appeared very nice, it is a new construction and the rooms were well outfitted. The problem was that it would run out of water, so no showers or flushing toilets. Plus they advertised good WiFi but it was so slow and weak that it was nearly impossible to get online. Which makes it very difficult to do any business and keep up with posts or share photos.

The second hotel, the Palace hotel, is an older property and more African but it is very adequate for me. It has good WiFi and a big plus, no problems with the water. (As yet). It also has a resturant on site. The one drawback is that it is further from Nakivale that the first property. The restaurant is not what you might find in your local Holiday Inn Express. It is located behind the hotel and is really nothing more than a pole barn. So if you enjoy open air dining this is place for you. 

We have recognized an extra need that was not figured into our original budget. We will need a security fence around the water well, to keep out animals and vandals. So that is on my task list this week to get cost estimates for purchasing and installing a chain link fence. Please be praying that we can find a fencing contractor that will give us a reasonable price quote. The area we need to enclose is only 15m x 45m.

I was in Mbarra yesterday morning getting information on piping, water tanks, water tower, and solar pumping equipment. I was at Davis & Shirtliff, a large company in East Africa that deals with pumping equipment and solar installations. While I was there I noticed a small generator that would be a great fit for the school and church. They were having a Christmas promotion and the price was very reasonable. So this morning we will pick up our new generator and take it with us to the school.

There are so many needs at the school it is difficult to know where to begin. The student body has grown to 587, nearly of of them are orphans. Most schools here operate on school fees. The parents pay for their children to go to school. The better the school the higher the school fees. The whole reason the Emmaus Global Outreach primary school was started is because Pastor Lewi saw that these children were not in school because they had no one to pay for them. So these children are now getting a good education at no cost to them. The downside to that is there are no funds to make improvements or pay for teachers.

These children are all refugees from more than a dozen war torn countries around East Africa. This Camp has been in existence for over 30 years and many people have made it there permanent homes. For them there is no going back to their native countries. The orphans have no real permanent home here, families have just taken them in so they have a place to sleep, but food is scarce. Some children may get a couple small meals a day but others may only get one and at times nothing for the day. This is another great need, to provide the children a morning meal of porridge. The sorghum flour and sugar for the porridge is fairly inexpensive but as with any program we want to begin here, above all we want it to be sustainable. To start a program no matter how good the intentions are and have it fail for lack of funding, not only gives a very bad impression of the organization but also is a very poor testimony before God.

Remember, you cannot take it with you but you can “Send It Ahead.” 
Of course we we funding to sustain these programs but above all else we covert your prayers: for the children, for the teachers, for Pastor Lewi as he administers all aspects of the school, that we would find favor with businesses and organizations we have to deal with, for health of the team members that come to help.


If you can help we have a way for you to donate to these children’s needs. Go to www.watchtherefore.tv click on the donate button at the top of the page and please make sure you designate your tax deductible donation to the “Send It Ahead” program.  If you would like to further designate your gift to one of the programs, simply add “water”, “teachers”, or “food” after the “Send It Ahead.” While you’re at the web site please click on the Send It Ahead button at the top of the page to look for more updates and photos from the school.